Great news for Tanzania!

A new partnership with The PILGRAM Foundation has allowed for a major expansion of GSC’s youth HIV/AIDS prevention program in Tanzania!

The PILGRIM Foundation and Global Service Corps-Tanzania’s (GSC-TZ) objective in this project has been to extend financial support to reduce the impact of the HIV/AIDS crisis on youth in Tanzania. The PILGRIM Foundation, through its support to GSC-TZ, has shown its awareness and concern for the need to address the current situation of HIV/AIDS prevalence in Tanzania and its spread among young people. As a result of this project, participating youth’s knowledge of HIV prevention is becoming more accurate, with the goal of translating this information into behavior changes which are reducing their risk of contracting the virus. GSC-TZ is impacting this situation in order to break this cycle caused by ignorance through peer education and student health club mobilization. This project report encompasses youth-focused events which have taken place in the past six months, and which will take place in the coming year in Arusha, Tanzania. Pilgrim Foundation has provided an on-going support for four staff (youth themselves) who have been engaged since July 2008 to ensure that there is a sustainable and on-going provision of monitoring and encouragement.  These peer educators work in participating secondary schools where GSC-TZ has conducted day camps in the past – now numbering 21 schools in the Arusha area. The three key elements of support by Pilgrim Foundation involve peer education through:

I. Engaging four dynamic youth leaders as GSC-TZ Youth Counterpart staff to do follow-up visits on an on-going basis to the 21 participating secondary schools under supervision of the GSC-TZ Youth Coordinator.

II. An annual meeting of teachers, parents and peer educators (a workshop-based forum for teachers, students and a few parents from each school).

III. Art & performance competitions which promote HIV/AIDS messages among youth.

The first and third of these three elements have been enacted during the period, while the second is to be addressed during the first half of this 2009 calendar year. The goals and outcomes of all three activities are being accomplished, to assist peer educators to promote their health clubs as a means to increase ‘buy-in’ of other students in the training activities. Students are educating and encouraging each other to use life skills to safeguard their HIV status.  Teacher and parent support for the health clubs is still lacking; this up to now has adversely determined the low level of clubs’ activity (especially in the government schools where teachers are over-worked and underpaid.) GSC-TZ’s efforts, through the peer education coordinators (PECs), has encouraged health clubs to meet at least once a month, and the frequent follow-ups are encouraging the groups to meet, make strategies and conduct at least one training each month. This may further improve as GSC incorporates lessons learned from other peer educator programs in Tanzania.

In August 2008, four PECs were chosen among the top performers of Arusha youth who had been working alongside the GSC HIV/AIDS awareness campaigns of the past two years. They were hired to undertake activities at each school where GSC-TZ has conducted day camps in the past six years – now numbering 21 schools in the Arusha area. Their job description is largely a field position with office time limited to attending bi-monthly briefing meetings.  Each PEC has been assigned to assist 4-5 schools at which GSC currently has peer education activities established. They are available during the times that peer education activities take place (customarily on weekday afternoons) at each school on a rotation. Their day-to-day activities involve:

Working with involved parties (headmaster, teachers) to revive peer education activities where they had ceased. Working with the teachers and health club leaders to create a feasible yearly plan.

Assisting the student leaders in running peer education activities including meetings, talent shows, sports competitions, etc

Teaching student leaders how to plan and execute peer education activities.

Teaching students how to be peer educators so they can conduct trainings for fellow students and pass-on the knowledge to future peer educators.

Providing additional trainings for students on other health and HIV related topics.

Attending all peer education activities at the assigned schools to provide support, monitoring and evaluation.

Assisting in planning and running the annual all-clubs meeting (date yet to be announced) and the annual post-day camp meeting (July 2009)

Helping to plan and implement day camp activities for June 2009.

Attending bi-monthly coordinator meetings at the GSC office

Keeping accurate records of activities and file necessary reports in a timely manner.

Working to involve GSC-TZ volunteers in health club activities where possible

The PECs’ direct supervisor has been GSC-TZ’s HIV/AIDS Program Coordinator, with the assistance of an GSC-TZ HIV fellow., Although the PECs have proven to be self-motivated and have taken initiative in great ways, the supervisor’s role has been as follows:

  • Liaise between headmaster/mistress and GSC
  • Assist in reviving club activities and interest in schools where they have ceased (which may involve visits to schools to talk to key players)
  • Collect/provide additional health information as requested by coordinators
  • Assist in arranging guest speakers, testing, etc
  • Provide support in conducting events, etc
  • Manage peer education budget
  • Run bi-monthly coordinators meeting
  • Assist coordinators in planning and problem solving
  • Provide additional training to coordinators
  • Provide overall support to coordinators  

Activities which have been conducted since the four PECs were selected in July and hired in August are described in this report. The PECs have met with the GSC-TZ’s HIV/AIDS Program Coordinator on a bi-monthly basis, and determined arrangements so that each PEC makes regular visits to their assigned four or five schools as described above.  During these visits, the PECs have encouraged specific activities which would be conducted at each site together with peer educator student leaders from the health clubs at each school and secondary school faculty who showed willingness to be involved.

 

 

The PECs have worked with the health clubs and peer educators in the schools to plan activities which educate and promote awareness of HIV/AIDS and promote no or low-risk behavior among youth. They have discussed condom demonstrations for classmates, organized role-plays followed by discussions about such topics as life skills, which enable youth to have a high self-esteem using various techniques such as the bridge model.  These methods are used to encourage youth to have goals and to follow trajectories in their lifestyles which will enable them to reach their goals while avoiding pitfalls. They have encouraged a compassionate attitude towards those living with HIV/AIDS by teaching about stigma. They have invited HIV+ persons, including youth, to speak to their fellow students, and have thereby encouraged them that it is possible to live positively with HIV/AIDS. In particular, they have encouraged students to be tested. 

 

The goal of the entire effort is to promote the following health club goals:

  • To create a generation free from HIV/AIDS
  • To decrease transmission of HIV by educating people on how to reduce HIV transmission
  • To encourage fitness through sports and nutrition
  • To eliminate myths about HIV
  • To reduce stigma through education
  • Encourage students to be leaders and role models

 

Overall, the project has had a resounding success, as testified by faculty and students. There is a noted enthusiasm and reviving of health clubs in schools where they had gone dormant. The awareness of students of life skills and HIV/AIDS prevention is on the rise. A significant achievement was made when Lemara Secondary School students requested to be tested for HIV, now possible without parental consent in Tanzania. 67 students and teachers at Lemara Secondary School were tested and the testers are to be commended, as this required them to work long past 5:00 pm without additional allowances. Despite that, they seemed really glad to be conducting the testing.  In the future we will try to arrange this in the mornings rather than afternoon, to avoid another situation like this. The testers agreed to return another day to test those they did not have time to test.  The testing brought additional transport costs to the projects, which were covered from savings described elsewhere in this report. However, future testing will possibly require additional funds reallocation, as we all agree in GSC-TZ management that this is one of the most important steps affecting behavior change.

 

 

Additional activities:

 

Additional activities took place in which Pilgrim Foundation support has indirectly supported.  These are described below:

 

  • Workshop on reproductive health, HIV/AIDS and Life Skills
  • Mkombozi, an Arusha street youth centre, combined with Arusha Meru Secondary School to teach students and street youth about matters of reproductive health, HIV/AIDS and life skills during in June, 2008. The five day workshop, entitled “HIV/Aids, Health & Life Skills Day Camp 2008” was facilitated by volunteers from Global Service Corps and offered tools for self-protection and personal development, and overall, it created a desire for further learning. The lessons were based on the principle that youth need more than just knowledge in order to protect themselves; they also need the ability, confidence and inner-strength to live a healthy and conscious life. To read the full story, view the HTML formatted e-mail message available at: 
    http://www.mkombozi.org/enews/newsshot_05july2008.html

 

  • Peer education training workshop:

It was decided that a peer education training workshop would be held annually during the fourth week of the June day camp activities to train ten students from each day camp school in peer education methods.  At the end of camp officers are elected, however, little else is done to train students to run a club or conduct on-going peer education activities at their schools. In addition, this has been a problem encountered when visiting previous day camp schools because the students are not sure what they should be doing.  It was felt that conducting this workshop immediately following camp would help to further train the students in what GSC-TZ wants them to accomplish at their schools.  In addition, having this workshop immediately following camp makes it possible to connect what the students recently learned with the action GSC-TZ wants them to take.

 

In this second peer education training workshop, (the first was in November 2007) 35 people were trained in peer education techniques, including 30 students, three teachers, and two GSC counterparts.  Participants received a combination of theory and practice during the workshop.  Topics included the difference between traditional and participatory learning, generative themes, and how to conduct learning needs assessments.  The participants also learned to make lesson plans and later conducted the lesson for the other participants, as if they were ‘students’ in their schools.  Students benefited in that they were able to practice being a peer educator and receive feedback.  Many felt that their confidence to educate their fellow students was increased.

 

Comments from the students at the end of session evaluation included:

  • Got knowledge on how to provide education to others
  • Got knowledge on how to be a facilitator and not just a teacher
  • Got courage and confidence to stand and speak in front of people
  • The event was held at the GSC-TZ office, as our new space allows us to accommodate as many as 35 attendees, the maximum size the facility can comfortably hold. 
  • HIV/AIDS and Health Awareness Theatre Collaboration between GSC-TZ, International School Moshi-Arusha Campus and Umoja Arts

 

GSC-TZ wishes to provide opportunities for all students to work together to impact HIV/AIDS education in communities.  An event to do just this is being organized for January-March, 2009.  This drama workshop will give youth an opportunity to show their talent in theatre while at the same time raising awareness of HIV/AIDS, health, and issues affecting young people today.  Over the course of five weekends, Tanzanian secondary students, in conjunction with students from the International School of Moshi-Arusha (ISM) Drama Department (who will assist in English, theatre technique, and directing), will write and rehearse short pieces educating in these topics.  Students will conduct a dress rehearsal at ISM-Arusha and then on the sixth weekend, they will perform at an event open to the entire Arusha community.  In addition to drama performances, there will be speakers to tell their short stories and educate the attendees in facts of HIV/AIDS/health. In addition, Linda Willms of Umoja Arts (and ISM) will be instrumental in assisting with planning and advertising the event, although GSC-TZ staff will be the chief organizers.  However, much oversight and conducting of the workshops will be done by the ISM drama teacher (Yolanda Romero) and ISM students with help from GSC-TZ staff and counterparts (for translation needs).   

 

It is our hope that, like the talent shows which have been well attended, this event will also reach the larger community with HIV lessons, as well as foster exchange between Tanzanian and ISM students. 

 

This event is being organized and funded through GSC-TZ by the Arusha Community Church, in order to give youth an opportunity to show their talent in theatre, while at the same time raising awareness of HIV/AIDS, health, and issues affecting young people today.  Tanzanian secondary students, in conjunction with students from ISM, would write, rehearse, and perform for a larger audience short (5-10 minute) pieces educating in these topics.   

 

The 21 secondary schools GSC-TZ works with will be broken into five blocks of four schools each.  Because of the need to limit numbers, five students from each school will be selected to participate (100 students total).  In addition, teachers interested in theater will be asked to attend and assist the students.  Each block of four schools will work together to create pieces to be performed.  Two to three performances from each block will be chosen to perform during the night of theatre.  To select these performances, each block will perform for themselves and then the group will discuss, give input, and select the acts to perform. 

 

  • Day 1: Introduction of event; Presentation of ‘stories’ that can be used to create ideas (guest speakers, video, written stories/articles, etc)
  • Day 2: Divide into groups, start brainstorming ideas
  • Day 3-5: Writing, rehearsal
  • Day 6: Dress rehearsal at ISM-Arusha campus (Would be on a weekday)
  • Day 7: Performance 

 

A school with a central location (such as Bondeni, Arusha Day, Arusha Sec, etc) will be asked to host the weekend workshops.  Having all students in the same place will allow for the supervising ISM drama teacher to access all groups.  In addition, this will be easier for the volunteer students from ISM to also assist. The dress rehearsal will take place at ISM-Arusha campus. The actual performance will take place at a central location yet identified. 

 

ISM drama students will play an integral role in helping to ‘direct’ the pieces created for performance.  Since they have knowledge of theatre techniques and various forms of performance, (monologue, comedy, etc) they will be involved from the beginning to assist the Tanzanian students in writing their script, blocking the performance, and rehearsing.  In addition, they will be able to help the Tanzanian students wishing to perform in English.  In addition, a dress rehearsal is planned to be performed in front of ISM students at ISM-Arusha Campus.  This will give the students the chance to perform in front of a smaller audience (and receive feedback) before the main performance. The event will be advertised through media such as radio, newspaper, flyers, and mailing lists, as well as students advertising at their schools and in communities. Tanzanian students and teachers will be enabled to attend events in town, and provided a transport stipend.   

The PILGRIM Foundation and Global Service Corps-Tanzania’s (GSC-TZ) objective in this project has been to extend financial support to reduce the impact of the HIV/AIDS crisis on youth in Tanzania. The PILGRIM Foundation, through its support to GSC-TZ, has shown its awareness and concern for the need to address the current situation of HIV/AIDS prevalence in Tanzania and its spread among young people. As a result of this project, participating youth’s knowledge of HIV prevention is becoming more accurate, with the goal of translating this information into behavior changes which are reducing their risk of contracting the virus. GSC-TZ is impacting this situation in order to break this cycle caused by ignorance through peer education and student health club mobilization.

This project report encompasses youth-focused events which have taken place in the past six months, and which will take place in the coming year in Arusha, Tanzania. Pilgrim Foundation has provided an on-going support for four staff (youth themselves) who have been engaged since July 2008 to ensure that there is a sustainable and on-going provision of monitoring and encouragement.  These peer educators work in participating secondary schools where GSC-TZ has conducted day camps in the past – now numbering 21 schools in the Arusha area.

The three key elements of support by Pilgrim Foundation involve peer education through:

I. Engaging four dynamic youth leaders as GSC-TZ Youth Counterpart staff to do follow-up visits on an on-going basis to the 21 participating secondary schools under supervision of the GSC-TZ Youth Coordinator.

II. An annual meeting of teachers, parents and peer educators (a workshop-based forum for teachers, students and a few parents from each school).

 

III. Art & performance competitions which promote HIV/AIDS messages among youth. 

 

The first and third of these three elements have been enacted during the period, while the second is to be addressed during the first half of this 2009 calendar year. The goals and outcomes of all three activities are being accomplished, to assist peer educators to promote their health clubs as a means to increase ‘buy-in’ of other students in the training activities. Students are educating and encouraging each other to use life skills to safeguard their HIV status.  Teacher and parent support for the health clubs is still lacking; this up to now has adversely determined the low level of clubs’ activity (especially in the government schools where teachers are over-worked and underpaid.) GSC-TZ’s efforts, through the peer education coordinators (PECs), has encouraged health clubs to meet at least once a month, and the frequent follow-ups are encouraging the groups to meet, make strategies and conduct at least one training each month. This may further improve as GSC incorporates lessons learned from other peer educator programs in Tanzania.

 

General progress during this period: 

 

Peer education in 21 participating schools:

 

In August 2008, four PECs were chosen among the top performers of Arusha youth who had been working alongside the GSC HIV/AIDS awareness campaigns of the past two years. They were hired to undertake activities at each school where GSC-TZ has conducted day camps in the past six years – now numbering 21 schools in the Arusha area. Their job description is largely a field position with office time limited to attending bi-monthly briefing meetings.  Each PEC has been assigned to assist 4-5 schools at which GSC currently has peer education activities established. They are available during the times that peer education activities take place (customarily on weekday afternoons) at each school on a rotation.

 

Their day-to-day activities involve:

  • Working with involved parties (headmaster, teachers) to revive peer education activities where they had ceased
  • Working with the teachers and health club leaders to create a feasible yearly plan
  • Assisting the student leaders in running peer education activities including meetings, talent shows, sports competitions, etc
  • Teaching student leaders how to plan and execute peer education activities
  • Teaching students how to be peer educators so they can conduct trainings for fellow students and pass-on the knowledge to future peer educators
  • Providing additional trainings for students on other health and HIV related topics
  • Attending all peer education activities at the assigned schools to provide support, monitoring and evaluation
  • Assisting in planning and running the annual all-clubs meeting (date yet to be announced) and the annual post-day camp meeting (July 2009)
  • Helping to plan and implement day camp activities for June 2009
  • Attending bi-monthly coordinator meetings at the GSC office
  • Keeping accurate records of activities and file necessary reports in a timely manner
  • Working to involve GSC-TZ volunteers in health club activities where possible

 

The PECs’ direct supervisor has been GSC-TZ’s HIV/AIDS Program Coordinator, with the assistance of an GSC-TZ HIV fellow., Although the PECs have proven to be self-motivated and have taken initiative in great ways, the supervisor’s role has been as follows:

  • Liaise between headmaster/mistress and GSC
  • Assist in reviving club activities and interest in schools where they have ceased (which may involve visits to schools to talk to key players)
  • Collect/provide additional health information as requested by coordinators
  • Assist in arranging guest speakers, testing, etc
  • Provide support in conducting events, etc
  • Manage peer education budget
  • Run bi-monthly coordinators meeting
  • Assist coordinators in planning and problem solving
  • Provide additional training to coordinators
  • Provide overall support to coordinators  

Activities which have been conducted since the four PECs were selected in July and hired in August are described in this report. The PECs have met with the GSC-TZ’s HIV/AIDS Program Coordinator on a bi-monthly basis, and determined arrangements so that each PEC makes regular visits to their assigned four or five schools as described above.  During these visits, the PECs have encouraged specific activities which would be conducted at each site together with peer educator student leaders from the health clubs at each school and secondary school faculty who showed willingness to be involved.

 

 

The PECs have worked with the health clubs and peer educators in the schools to plan activities which educate and promote awareness of HIV/AIDS and promote no or low-risk behavior among youth. They have discussed condom demonstrations for classmates, organized role-plays followed by discussions about such topics as life skills, which enable youth to have a high self-esteem using various techniques such as the bridge model.  These methods are used to encourage youth to have goals and to follow trajectories in their lifestyles which will enable them to reach their goals while avoiding pitfalls. They have encouraged a compassionate attitude towards those living with HIV/AIDS by teaching about stigma. They have invited HIV+ persons, including youth, to speak to their fellow students, and have thereby encouraged them that it is possible to live positively with HIV/AIDS. In particular, they have encouraged students to be tested. 

 

The goal of the entire effort is to promote the following health club goals:

  • To create a generation free from HIV/AIDS
  • To decrease transmission of HIV by educating people on how to reduce HIV transmission
  • To encourage fitness through sports and nutrition
  • To eliminate myths about HIV
  • To reduce stigma through education
  • Encourage students to be leaders and role models

 

Overall, the project has had a resounding success, as testified by faculty and students. There is a noted enthusiasm and reviving of health clubs in schools where they had gone dormant. The awareness of students of life skills and HIV/AIDS prevention is on the rise. A significant achievement was made when Lemara Secondary School students requested to be tested for HIV, now possible without parental consent in Tanzania. 67 students and teachers at Lemara Secondary School were tested and the testers are to be commended, as this required them to work long past 5:00 pm without additional allowances. Despite that, they seemed really glad to be conducting the testing.  In the future we will try to arrange this in the mornings rather than afternoon, to avoid another situation like this. The testers agreed to return another day to test those they did not have time to test.  The testing brought additional transport costs to the projects, which were covered from savings described elsewhere in this report. However, future testing will possibly require additional funds reallocation, as we all agree in GSC-TZ management that this is one of the most important steps affecting behavior change.

 

 

Additional activities:

 

Additional activities took place in which Pilgrim Foundation support has indirectly supported.  These are described below:

 

  • Workshop on reproductive health, HIV/AIDS and Life Skills
  • Mkombozi, an Arusha street youth centre, combined with Arusha Meru Secondary School to teach students and street youth about matters of reproductive health, HIV/AIDS and life skills during in June, 2008. The five day workshop, entitled “HIV/Aids, Health & Life Skills Day Camp 2008” was facilitated by volunteers from Global Service Corps and offered tools for self-protection and personal development, and overall, it created a desire for further learning. The lessons were based on the principle that youth need more than just knowledge in order to protect themselves; they also need the ability, confidence and inner-strength to live a healthy and conscious life. To read the full story, view the HTML formatted e-mail message available at: 
    http://www.mkombozi.org/enews/newsshot_05july2008.html

 

  • Peer education training workshop:

It was decided that a peer education training workshop would be held annually during the fourth week of the June day camp activities to train ten students from each day camp school in peer education methods.  At the end of camp officers are elected, however, little else is done to train students to run a club or conduct on-going peer education activities at their schools. In addition, this has been a problem encountered when visiting previous day camp schools because the students are not sure what they should be doing.  It was felt that conducting this workshop immediately following camp would help to further train the students in what GSC-TZ wants them to accomplish at their schools.  In addition, having this workshop immediately following camp makes it possible to connect what the students recently learned with the action GSC-TZ wants them to take.

 

In this second peer education training workshop, (the first was in November 2007) 35 people were trained in peer education techniques, including 30 students, three teachers, and two GSC counterparts.  Participants received a combination of theory and practice during the workshop.  Topics included the difference between traditional and participatory learning, generative themes, and how to conduct learning needs assessments.  The participants also learned to make lesson plans and later conducted the lesson for the other participants, as if they were ‘students’ in their schools.  Students benefited in that they were able to practice being a peer educator and receive feedback.  Many felt that their confidence to educate their fellow students was increased.

 

Comments from the students at the end of session evaluation included:

  • Got knowledge on how to provide education to others
  • Got knowledge on how to be a facilitator and not just a teacher
  • Got courage and confidence to stand and speak in front of people
  • The event was held at the GSC-TZ office, as our new space allows us to accommodate as many as 35 attendees, the maximum size the facility can comfortably hold. 
  • HIV/AIDS and Health Awareness Theatre Collaboration between GSC-TZ, International School Moshi-Arusha Campus and Umoja Arts

 

GSC-TZ wishes to provide opportunities for all students to work together to impact HIV/AIDS education in communities.  An event to do just this is being organized for January-March, 2009.  This drama workshop will give youth an opportunity to show their talent in theatre while at the same time raising awareness of HIV/AIDS, health, and issues affecting young people today.  Over the course of five weekends, Tanzanian secondary students, in conjunction with students from the International School of Moshi-Arusha (ISM) Drama Department (who will assist in English, theatre technique, and directing), will write and rehearse short pieces educating in these topics.  Students will conduct a dress rehearsal at ISM-Arusha and then on the sixth weekend, they will perform at an event open to the entire Arusha community.  In addition to drama performances, there will be speakers to tell their short stories and educate the attendees in facts of HIV/AIDS/health. In addition, Linda Willms of Umoja Arts (and ISM) will be instrumental in assisting with planning and advertising the event, although GSC-TZ staff will be the chief organizers.  However, much oversight and conducting of the workshops will be done by the ISM drama teacher (Yolanda Romero) and ISM students with help from GSC-TZ staff and counterparts (for translation needs).   

 

It is our hope that, like the talent shows which have been well attended, this event will also reach the larger community with HIV lessons, as well as foster exchange between Tanzanian and ISM students. 

 

This event is being organized and funded through GSC-TZ by the Arusha Community Church, in order to give youth an opportunity to show their talent in theatre, while at the same time raising awareness of HIV/AIDS, health, and issues affecting young people today.  Tanzanian secondary students, in conjunction with students from ISM, would write, rehearse, and perform for a larger audience short (5-10 minute) pieces educating in these topics.   

 

The 21 secondary schools GSC-TZ works with will be broken into five blocks of four schools each.  Because of the need to limit numbers, five students from each school will be selected to participate (100 students total).  In addition, teachers interested in theater will be asked to attend and assist the students.  Each block of four schools will work together to create pieces to be performed.  Two to three performances from each block will be chosen to perform during the night of theatre.  To select these performances, each block will perform for themselves and then the group will discuss, give input, and select the acts to perform. 

 

  • Day 1: Introduction of event; Presentation of ‘stories’ that can be used to create ideas (guest speakers, video, written stories/articles, etc)
  • Day 2: Divide into groups, start brainstorming ideas
  • Day 3-5: Writing, rehearsal
  • Day 6: Dress rehearsal at ISM-Arusha campus (Would be on a weekday)
  • Day 7: Performance 

 

A school with a central location (such as Bondeni, Arusha Day, Arusha Sec, etc) will be asked to host the weekend workshops.  Having all students in the same place will allow for the supervising ISM drama teacher to access all groups.  In addition, this will be easier for the volunteer students from ISM to also assist. The dress rehearsal will take place at ISM-Arusha campus. The actual performance will take place at a central location yet identified. 

 

ISM drama students will play an integral role in helping to ‘direct’ the pieces created for performance.  Since they have knowledge of theatre techniques and various forms of performance, (monologue, comedy, etc) they will be involved from the beginning to assist the Tanzanian students in writing their script, blocking the performance, and rehearsing.  In addition, they will be able to help the Tanzanian students wishing to perform in English.  In addition, a dress rehearsal is planned to be performed in front of ISM students at ISM-Arusha Campus.  This will give the students the chance to perform in front of a smaller audience (and receive feedback) before the main performance. The event will be advertised through media such as radio, newspaper, flyers, and mailing lists, as well as students advertising at their schools and in communities. Tanzanian students and teachers will be enabled to attend events in town, and provided a transport stipend.   

Advertisements

One response to “Great news for Tanzania!

  1. These chemicals pass through the heart, the lungs and the
    bloodstream and finally damage cells in the brain. If that was not enough they are free from
    nicotine and non-toxic, there are no detrimental effects towards passive smokers and the vapour is completely odourless and does not fog up a room.
    His recent research interests includes the
    harmonization of socio-demographic variables for
    national and cross-national marketing analysis.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s